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that was flowing around. no such ultimatum was put forward. the russian foreign secretary sergey lavrov. >> this is a question of defending our citizens and compatriots, and ensuring human rights especially the right to life. those who are trying to interpret the situation as a sort of aggression and threatening us with sanctions and boycotts, these are the same partners who have consistently been declaring ultimatums and renounce dialogue. >> now, there may be an announcement from the russian foreign ministry saying they have come here to secure human lives and russ citizens but at the same time they also carry a pretty big stick. russian president vladimir putin making a surprise inspection of troops just across the border in russia, in an area on the northern and eastern border with the ukraine. they said those war games were scheduled months ago. but obviously given the environment, nobody is confidentably looking at that. we know the ukrainian -- comfortably looking at that. border line in that area where the war games are going, the north and the east of the country, and it indica
foreign minister has been speak. sergei lavrov, what did he have to say? >> reporter: it was interesting, an astonishing really. he had a prepared speech. this was clearly aimed at events in syria. and he said that military intervention usually abnormally harmed civilians and that you shouldn't intervene on the pretext of protecting civilians. and then all of a sudden he departed into a very robust, angry defense on russia's actions in ukraine in which he said russia intervened military to protect russian civilians. so, you know, our experience of sergei lavrov in geneva is normally a very clever operator. a clever foreign diplomat. but his speech today was really caught contradictory. not the one he planned to make. obviously changed on the plane coming over here to insert the section in which he was very blunt. it's our business. we need to protect russian civilians in ukraine. >> sit important to understand why ukraine matters so much in russia. did he spell out the historical links? >> not so much, no. what he talked about was ultra nationalists, violent extremists. he was referring
they are filed by rather hostile comments. sergei lavrov issen tkpwaeup en that as well. >> the troops have moved and poised on borders. on one side, the russians justifying what they have done. mr. lavrov speaking in geneva today. talking about ultra nationalistic with anti-semitic tendencies. and the west on its side. we heard mr. kerry yesterday, mr. hague today. they feel they need to respond to what they see is a violation of international law. but that's one level. and the second level you can hear from all of them is they are trying also to send messages of whether there is room to find a diplomatic way out of this. it's worth listening to what they say for what they want mr. lavrov was saying. they want to stand by the february 21st agreement. that was the agreement. the government, when it was then in opposition made then president yanukovych. the russians were focusing on what was going to be a national dialogue for which you can real self rule to turn it probably into some sort of federation. that was right. then there would be a nationwide referendum. that's beyond all the rhetoric. t
william haig warns of consequences and costs if it doesn't change course. sergey lavrov insisting that his country has a duty to protect ethnic russians in ukraine. donetske, is the home of viktor yanukovych. rory challenge in moscow. let's go to tim friend who is in the ukrainian capital of kiev. this suggesting that russians, the ukrainian defense ministry now being denied from russia. what's the story from where you are tim? >> reporter: well i think everyone has an agenda obviously with this crisis in crimea. and of course, to a certain extent it is in the ukrainians' interest to keep reports of russian aggression or alleged aggression or forthcoming aggression high on the agenda. now, it pa may well frof to be e in the -- prove to be true in the coming hours that russia is going to carry out some kind of ultimatum or fulfill some kind of deadline for ukrainian troops have have been -- who have been surrounded in crimea by pro-russian forces, in their barracks, on their ships, may make good this reported threat which was coming from sources certified the defense ministry here, may ma
counterpart sergey lavrov. >> michael, forgive me for the bluntness of this question. when we spend so much time on the international story. why does the u.s. impair the ongoing crisis in ukraine and particularly in crimea? >> that is threshold question, no question about it. that is the first question when the president ultimately faces the press on this that he will get from the press corps. a destabilized ukraine means a destabilized europe and all kinds of problems for the united states. the president also says today, when congress does return, they're out today on a snow day, he wants them to take up sanctions in coordination with the european union, against russia in retaliation for this. harry reid, the democratic leader says we can't wait, we have to go it alone. only 2% of the trade is done with russia. this affects europeans much more than it does the united states, in a much more direct fangs. any unilateral sanctions from united states wouldn't have the bite unless the europeans are going along with that. there's a considerable amount of consultation going on between the united
, sergey lavrov, and his chinese counterpart have spoken by phone about the situation. what can you tell us about that? >> reporter: well, we know simply from the russian foreign ministry that they had this talk and that their views, russia and china, their views coincide on this issue and that they would be staying in close contact. there are so many high-level talks going on. there is also an osce meeting this afternoon to try and resolve this physician, and john kerry will be coming to kiev on tuesday. so, so many diplomatic efforts. and i've got to tell you, the people here in crimea feel like thaerz caught in the middle of it, and a lot of people say, please, put the message across that right here it's peaceful now. it seems to be that the real anguish, the angst is going on in the war of words around this small part of ukraine, christine. >> that's a really good point. diana magnay, thank you so much. and of course, so much of the issue here is that ukraine is quite literally the pipeline for russia and so much exports of oil and gas to europe. this is right there, the footprint, the
ahead. this morning, foreign minister sergey lavrov insisted his government is acting in its own defense. here's nbc's jim maceda who has more from moscow. >> reporter: putin now has his hand on the russian crown jewel. crimea gives putin an essential warm water port, and it counters in his mind the nightmare scenario. that's what he sees as an ultranationalist government suddenly cancelling russia's lease on the black see base and kiev taking control of crimea and then joining nato down the line, bringing the enemy, in his mind, right back to russia's doorstep. so vladimir putin has made that calculus, and it's now unclear just what the west can do about it. chuck, back to you. >> thank you, jim. right now, according to folks i've talked to, the u.s. has three options, none of them involve the u.s. military. the first, the u.s. could move along with european allies to officially suspend or kick russia out of the g8. that would be symbolic. second, the administration could pursue its own sanctions that target russian banks as well as international sanctions, targeting russian oil compani
they will start to see that. >> reporter: but in switzerland, russia's foreign minister, sergey lavrov, again said moscow was protecting russian citizens in crimea. and he lashed back at threats of economic penalties. >> ( translated ): those who attempt to interpret the situation as an act of aggression and threaten us with sanctions and boycotts, these are the very same partners of ours who consistently have encouraged political forces close to them to deliver an ultimatum and refuse dialogue, to ignore the concerns of southern and eastern regions of ukraine, which has ultimately polarized ukrainian society. >> reporter: back in kiev, rumors of war stirred differing responses. this couple, a ukrainian woman and russian man, urged calm. >> ( translated ): we are against the conflict. we are for peace and friendship. we do not want war. >> we do not want people to kill each other. we want people to live peacefully everywhere, on all continents and everywhere in other countries. >> reporter: but others seemed ready to man the ramparts. >> we have no fear at all. now our children are going to milita
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8